What is Your Elevator Speech?

Imagine hopping into an elevator to meet with an existing client on the 14th floor. You overhear the lady next to you state to a coworker she needs to purchase a new Acme model no. 5, extra-large green widget for the downtown office. Wait a minute; YOU sell Acme no. 5, extra-large green widgets! It’s time to spring into action, but you have less than a minute before the elevator reaches the 14th floor and your new prospect gets away. No time for the Power Point, just enough information to pique curiosity, and set an appointment. That’s an “elevator speech”.

Of course, it need not be in an elevator, escalator, or restroom stall. For those of us in sales, we might have this prepared already. But have you practiced it lately? For those of us not in sales, it’s a good idea to develop one for your church, civic club or next job interview.

According to Mindtools.com, there is a simple six-step formula for creating your own “sales pitch on the fly”.

1 – Identify your goal. What is it you wish to accomplish? To set up a sales presentation or get the name of the decision maker?  just to find out if the strangers organization is hiring or do you actually want to set an interview? At this stage of the game it is probably best to tread lightly and simply get the contact information.

2 – Explain what you do. What do you want your new found friend to remember most about what you say?

3 – Communicate your uniqueness. What makes you different from all the other salespeople? Is it your experience or an innovative approach?

4 – Engage with a question. Take the “temperature” of the receiver rather than trying to convince them of something. “Does that sound like something your company needs?”

5 – Put it all together. Make it informative, yet very concise. Always include an initial “ask” that isn’t too pushy.

6 – Practice. Louis Pasteur stated; “Chance favors the prepared mind”, so be ready! Remember, a “sales pitch” is a SPEECH. All great speakers and actors have to know their lines. You have to practice it, if it is to be effective.

http://MomentumSeminars.com

 

 

Four Conflict Styles of Communication

Most people hate conflict and will do what they can to avoid it. However, when we interact with others, there will be disagreements from time to time. Our words are our weapons of choice. Use them sparingly and we may be taken advantage by other coworkers. Use them too quick or often and we run the chance of being viewed as a workplace bully. We have the right to defend ourselves but it’s a delicate balance between ignoring a rude remark and speaking up.

Assertive Communication

Assertive communicators think win-win. They will pursue what is due them but not at the exclusion of anyone else. The assertive individual understands all co-workers have rights and are to be treated with respect. They are generally easy to get along with, yet will maintain organizational policies and standards. This type of positive communication style is good for the overall morale of the group and is generally expected of those in leadership positions.

Aggressive Communication

In short, an aggressive communicator is a bully. They consider their wants above the needs of others and look for those to exploit. However, their tactics may not be overt and more manipulative in nature. They are fine to take advantage of others if it will make their own jobs easier.

A bully only respects one thing: strength. If you are correct and have a right to something, be willing to confront them. Address their behavior as unacceptable. This

Angry Woman Bezel Case Office Secretariat

may seem obvious but on a deeper level it is a show of strength. Of course, it is always necessary to assess the total damage of kicking over the euphemistic beehive in the workplace. What will be the repercussions of standing up to an aggressive communicator if that person is your boss? Once they know you will stand up to them, bullies will generally leave you for other prey elsewhere.

Passive Communication

The passive communicator is a perpetual people-pleaser. They get along by going along, never wanting to upset the apple cart. Though they view themselves as the salt of the earth, others will see them as weak and mark them for exploitation. They are often made a victim because they will not voice their opinions stand up for themselves.

Passives generally have issues with setting priorities. They are often busy putting out other people’s fires because they can never say “no”. They need encouragement. The positive words you give them may be the only confidence builders in their lives. Ask them for opinions and solutions on team matters. However, it is important to ensure they understand job requirements and how their part affects the team. If in management, set the priorities for them.

Passive-Aggressive Communication

business_man_beautiful_man_business_business_men_man_young_male_businessman-625568.jpg!dYes, there are those who manage to be both passive AND aggressive at the same time. They will stand up to others… but behind their backs. They have an “I’ll show you” mentality and will carry a grudge. They love to play the victim, yelling one minute and then crying the next if yelling doesn’t work.

Understand the game the passive-aggressive plays but do not play it yourself. To do so would only enable them. Stay focused on what is fact and relevant. Once they realize emotional outbursts do not work, they might come to their senses. When dealing with this personality, ensure everyone is in agreement and there won’t be any “misunderstandings” later. It may be prudent to write a summary in and email to them after a conversation.

In one of my workshops, we go deep into what makes a person behave in such ways. Find out more at: http://MomentumSeminars.com

Can We Talk?

I have long said “Real estate is a people business”. Yes, I know it sounds cliché, and I guess it is, but don’t let that deter you from the truth, and simplicity of the statement. I personally have nothing to sell you other than myself and the services I provide. When it comes to selling, a “widget” is something much easier to retail than is the concept of home. The buyer wants to have the pride and security of owning a three-, or four-bedroom house. Convincing them that we have the knowledge, and years (or months) of experience to make their dreams come true, is a much more delicate sales pitch.

So with that in mind, why would we not grasp the importance of good communication with our clients throughout the entire process? Whether they are buyers or sellers, they need the reassurances we give them. Reassurances that technology in and of itself simply does not provide. As an instructor, I teach a two-hour continuing education class entitled Professional Courtesy; Etiquette and Consideration in the Real Estate Industry. In it, one of the concepts I briefly convey the importance of remaining “high touch” in a high-tech world. Today, we have so many modes of communication at our disposal, but is it one size fits all?  Be it good news, or bad, from time to time (and many times), we simply have to look our clients in the eye and give a status report. But how is it best done to convey a message or update in a way that is still personable?

My personal preference is; in person. Though the restrictions of time and distance dictate many of these occasions are over the phone. As of yet, I have never taken on a client without first meeting them, or having an in-depth dialogue, so I just assume they expect a certain amount of face, or talk time throughout the entire experience. For the first home buyer or seller, real estate can be pretty intimidating. Yes, even in the 21st century, a certain amount of “hand-holding” still has to take place. As Realtors, perhaps that’s our most important skill; assuring people we didn’t forget about them, and that everything is going to be O.K.

Much communication in the past few years, whether business or personal, has taken place through short message service (SMS) or “text messages”.  These are short, one-way electronic notes. We have seen instances where teens, college students, and many of us may send texts back and forth a dozen times or more. So, the question begs to be asked; why not just make a phone call?

Texting has two distinct advantages by its very nature. A text is fast and convenient. But does every communiqué have to be fast and convenient? Should it be? Some of its downfalls are that it does not provide the details of an email, nor is it a true conversation. Perhaps the biggest disadvantage to SMS is you cannot see the face of the person reading your words.

I have often been overheard stating that “texts are of the devil”, but I’m not going to say that here. You can’t see it right now, but I promise you I’m giving the “winky face”.  So, when to text, and when not to text? Consider your expected outcome of the communication. Is it to update a minor point, or to impart important details for your customer or client which with to make a decision?

There is a place, time and subject matter for everything and that includes texting. Some acceptable texts, provided you are not driving, mountain climbing or delivering a baby, could include…

“I’m running a few minutes behind”

“I had your flyers made, and will place them in the box this afternoon.”

“I updated your online photos” 

These messages are routine, almost mundane in nature. At no point does it require the client to make a decision or otherwise stop what they are doing. However, on the other hand…

“Your loan was denied”

 “The house has termites”

“The contract fell through,… I’ll call you Monday afternoon”

…should probably never be texted. And no, a smiley face does NOT make your clients feel better

after any of these quips.

After all how would you feel to realize your dreams were potentially shattered in a note that was limited to fewer than 150 characters? We’ve all heard of the boy who breaks up with his girlfriend through a text message. It’s just considered… well, inconsiderate. So many times, we truly don’t know what our clients think or feel. Though we can get a sense if we see how they react or at least hear the inflections in their voice.

So, before you fire off that short electronic note or private message someone through a social media site, consider the receiving side might not read it exactly as you thought you wrote it.  At least with an email, you have the length to better clarify your message.

BlaineSpeaks@gmail.com

 

 

 

Welcome to my Blog!

Hello, my name is Blaine Little, and I reside in Murfreesboro, which is in the heart of the great State of Tennessee! I have been a Realtor for almost 20 years, a business trainer for over a decade, and even a corporate entertainer as a professional magician! Just between us, that last one is probably the most fun!

So, why add yet one more set of incoherent ramblings to the internet? Well, I guess the short answer would be “why not”. But that’s too cliché. Through my business, corporate training, and dealings with other people, I have come across several interesting observations about businesses in America, and the people who operate them. Not earth-shattering, just interesting. Through that perspective, I have developed different philosophies about why people do the things they do, and how that effects their organizations.

Besides that, I like to talk a lot. I have written some articles, mostly for Realtor Associations. I have also trained and managed professionals, redesigned programs, and sat in on more committee meetings than I can remember. I spent much of 2017 on the road helping business people sharpen their tools. It’s interesting why people do the things they do, but it is even more interesting as to why WE react to those other people.  Some times, that’s just outright funny! Well, to me least. Normally, I’m pretty quiet, but once you get me chatting, away I go!

The purpose of this web log is not to repeat the same “motivational guru” clichés as has been touted so many times in recent past.  As the name implies, “Momentum Seminars” means so much more than rehashing what has already been said. Instead, I will look at business concepts and training issues from a completely different perspective. So, thanks for taking the time to occasionally sit back, and take note of my ideas, observations, and philosophy. I promise, I will try to not take myself too serious. You may access more of me, as well as contact me for IN-HOUSE TRAINING,  at my website, MomentumSeminars.com

Blaine Little

MomentumSeminars.com

BlaineSpeak@gmail.com